RECOMMENDED READING: The Tennessean: 4 Plead Guilty In Gun-Smuggling Case — But Brit Holds Out Across The Atlantic With ‘Sovereign Citizen’-Like Paperwork Blitz; Court Sent Bill For $245 Million

EDITOR’S NOTE: It’s often said that the so-called “sovereign citizen” movement is loosely knit.

But does it really matter if there is an in-depth, organized management structure, slate of officers or official roster of adherents if an individual anywhere — at any place in time — can borrow pages from a “sovereign” playbook to, say, gum up the legal process?

The PP Blog encourages its audience to visit the site of the Tennessean (link below) and read about how Guy Denton Savage is reaching out from England into the United States to forestall or derail extradition by adopting paperwork tactics associated with U.S. “sovereign citizens.”

Something to think about: How do Democratic nations that necessarily must provide both defendants and victims access to transparent justice deal with “sovereign” groups, lone wolves or sympathizers whose aim may be wholly disingenuous?

Although “sovereigns” commonly purport to be great defenders of constitutional law and individual freedom, their maneuverings often project a preference for anarchy or a breakdown in the rule of law, the key underpinning of civilized society. Among “sovereigns,” it’s often the case that the good of the few outweighs the good of the many.

And it’s also often the case that the blame for a thorny legal predicament gets transferred to investigators, prosecutors, judges and other public officials on a bizarre theory that a contract is self-executing — i.e., if you mail or otherwise deliver a demand for a remedy in your favor — and if the recipient doesn’t respond to the demand or submit to the preordained remedy — the recipient has defaulted or agreed to the demand by remaining silent.

The PP Blog has reported on incidents in which bills or payment demands totaling in the millions, billions or even the trillions of dollars have been sent to public officials. That any person could adopt this line of thought as legitimate remains a source for great introspection. As always, the question becomes one about whether a “sovereign” will be satisfied with the public recording of his fantasies on court dockets — or whether he or she will seek to exact a penalty on law-enforcement officers, prosecutors, judges and litigation opponents by recording fraudulent liens and encumbrances against them.

A separate danger emerges when “sovereigns” turn to other “sovereigns” to begin blanketing courthouses with fantastical pleadings. There also have been cases in which “sovereigns” unhappy with a decision made by a state-trial judge sues the judge in federal court by divining a civil-rights violation.

Purported “sovereign” ideology is magical thinking of the most dangerous sort because it sets the stage for lawlessness to gain an increasing toehold over the institutions of democracy and for the rule of law to take a back seat to the whims of a mob or an extremist with access to a word-processor . . .

REDACTED SCREEN SHOT: Englishman Guy D. Savage sent this invoice for more than $245 million to a U.S. federal judge in Tennessee.

An Englishman indicted in the United States on gun-smuggling charges has sent a U.S. court a bill for more than $245 million and claims “that the United States, the Department of Justice and the U.S. District Court are ‘legal fictions,'” according to the Tennessean.

When the court did not respond to the invoice, Guy D. Savage essentially argued that the court was in default and tacked on an interest penalty of nearly $5 million, the newspaper reported.

U.S. federal prosecutors now have raised the specter of an international “sovereign citizen” reaching across the Atlantic into Tennessee to derail the U.S. case.

Read the story in the Tennessean.

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3 Responses to “RECOMMENDED READING: The Tennessean: 4 Plead Guilty In Gun-Smuggling Case — But Brit Holds Out Across The Atlantic With ‘Sovereign Citizen’-Like Paperwork Blitz; Court Sent Bill For $245 Million”

  1. http://tpmmuckraker.talkingpointsmemo.com/2012/02/british_man_using_sovereign_citizen_tactics_to_get.php

    One of the filings, titled a “verified plain statement of Truth,” provided a long and rambling denial of the charges. “I deny that I am incorporated. I deny that I am a person. I, without any legal disabilities fully capable of bearing a bond, a man on the land, a lawful man, a stranger to the public trust, hereby specifically and expressly deny the existence of the UNITED STATES, UNITED STATE OF AMERICA, US, USA, WASHINGTON DC, UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT, UNITED NATIONS, STATE OF TENNESSEE, UNITED KINGDOM, GUY DENTON SAVAGE, and any and all US vessels.”

    If he denies the existence of the United States, United State[s] of America, US and the USA, how did he send the long rambling filing? What address did he put on the envelope?

    As “Rainbow Chard” noted in the link above, there is always David Icke, and the good people on his forum.
    “Bob the Builder” and the Strawman
    http://forum.davidicke.com/showthread.php?t=199884
    Best quote:

    Spud the scarecrow does not have a birth certificate, a vehicle registration document, a tax demand, a National Insurance Number, a bank account, etc., and is not referred to as ‘Mr. Spud’. So Spud is a Freeman on the Land.

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  2. Tony H: Best quote:

    Spud the scarecrow does not have a birth certificate, a vehicle registration document, a tax demand, a National Insurance Number, a bank account, etc., and is not referred to as ‘Mr. Spud’. So Spud is a Freeman on the Land.

    Hi Tony,

    That is a good quote, but someone may have topped it at TalkGold today in the JSS Tripler thread.

    Yesterday, someone posted a link to the CONSOB document. The next poster ignored it, firing up an “I got paid post.”

    The poster below that delivered a line for the ages:

    “Fredrick Mann think (sic) its (sic) waste to be under jurisdictions.”

    Another outtake from the same post:

    “Just like Fredrick Mann said, even if you get a license or anything to make it more safest (sic) but its not gonna to happened (sic).”

    It seems pretty clear that English is not the first language of the poster. But it also seems clear that he or she either has suspended all disbelief or is so intellectually lazy that he or she will accept any explanation as valid.

    Patrick

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