Only Days After Negative CONSOB Finding On JSS Tripler, Affiliate Press Release Claims ‘Program’ Lets Members ‘Start With Just $10 And Turn It Into A Fortune’

An affiliate's "press release" for JSS Tripler/JustBeenPaid is juxtaposed on Google News today against information about CONSOB's ban of promos for the "opportunity" in Italy. The affiliate's release ignores the CONSOB news, positions JSS/JBP as a way to make a "fortune" -- and does not explain that JSS/JBP members must affirm they are not with the "government." The release also ignores conflicts between the "opportunity's" written words and the spoken words of purported operator Frederick Mann.

At the moment, Google News is providing an interesting juxtaposition on the subject of JSS Tripler, the purported arm of the “JustBeenPaid” program that does not identify itself with a nation-state, makes members affirm they are not with the “government” and advertises an absurd monthly return of 60 percent.

Frederick Mann, the “opportunity’s” purported operator, was identified in 2008 promos as a pitchman for AdSurfDaily. The U.S. Secret Service called ASD an online Ponzi scheme that had gathered at least $110 million and defrauded thousands of people. JSS Tripler/JustBeenPaid advertises a daily payout rate twice that of ASD.

As the screen shot above shows, Google News today is publishing information on JSS Tripler from three sources. Two of the sources report on the April 23 JSS Tripler promotional ban by CONSOB, the Italian securities regulator.

A third source — dated May 2, nine days after CONSOB announced the JSS Tripler ban — does not reference the ban at all. Instead, it instructs readers via an affiliate’s press release that JSS Tripler is “an income-generating program that lets investors start with just $10 and turn it into a fortune. Essentially an HYIP, the program factors in the daily compounding system to increase earnings or make daily withdrawals as any investor would wish.”

One of the issues in the ASD Ponzi case is lack of disclosure to investors.

JSS Tripler/JustBeenPaid has no known securities registrations. Regardless, the affiliate’s release defines participants as “investors” and positions the program as one that is passive in nature. Claims in the release easily could lead to questions about whether the “opportunity” and its affiliates are benefiting in ASD-like fashion from the sale of unregistered securities by a global network of unregistered brokers.

In March, Mann told members it was OK to describe the opportunity as an investment program. Regardless, this line appears in his own program’s member agreement. (Italics added):

5. I have NOT been led to believe that this activity is an investment activity, franchise, or employment opportunity.

Although the release prompts readers (in the first paragraph) to “look closely at what they are getting into and ensure that they are joining income opportunities through programs that are proven to truly deliver financial freedom and sustainability,” it does not explain why the Member Agreement says one thing and Mann another.

Nor does it explain why any reasonable person would direct money to an entity whose Member Agreement also says this. (Italics added):

6. I affirm that I am not an employee or official of any government agency, nor am I acting on behalf of or collecting information for or on behalf of any government agency.

7. I affirm that I am not an employee, by contract or otherwise, of any media or research company, and I am not reading any of the JBP pages in order to collect information for someone else.

Bizarre ambiguities, incongruities and internal inconsistencies are common in the HYIP fraud sphere.

News about CONSOB’s JSS Tripler ban was published in English on CONSOB’s own website April 23. It also was published on the PP Blog and other sites, including the sites referenced by Google News.

Even as the affiliate was prompting JSS Tripler/JustBeenPaid prospects to “look closely,” he apparently missed information that was available through simple web searches — and this apparently also occurred after he missed the conflict between Mann’s words and the “opportunity’s” published Member Agreement.

The release concludes with these words:

“People who want real money from a reliable online networking system without the fuss and tricks should visit [URL deleted by PP Blog] to learn more.”

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10 Responses to “Only Days After Negative CONSOB Finding On JSS Tripler, Affiliate Press Release Claims ‘Program’ Lets Members ‘Start With Just $10 And Turn It Into A Fortune’”

  1. Help me understand something here. Why is it that when a unique program like
    JBP/JSS Tripler comes along that has helped so many people get out of debt and provide a better lifestyle for themselves, is consider a scam. Yes, is is different than the usual rat-race jobs out there that we have been brain washed in believing is the American Dream but, does that make it wrong. No one is FORCED or manipulated into joining JBP. It is completely voluntary!

    I was reading similar negative posts on another forum run by a guy like Patrick who was lam-basing JBP, only to find out that he eventually joined JBP and ultimately stopped his negative posting. He is my referral.

    Give JBP a chance to prove itself and understand the entire system and what it does before throwing it to the dogs.

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  2. No. You’re wrong. Every penny in “profit” that anyone makes, is money that was stolen from someone else. Can you not admit that that is a bad thing. When programs like this promise to pay out X amount for Y days, they are a scam when they take your money, not when they fail to pay it back. When you promise to pay more than you took, and you have no way of making more than you took (plus what you agreed to pay back) you’re stealing, but the dumber people who fall for it don’t realize it because they DO pay some people back (so they’ll go on all the forums and scream I GOT PAID!) and even the ones who lose, oftentimes get paid back at 2% a day for awhile. So if they pay YOU back 2% for 25 days, you don’t even know they stole half of your “investment” for the best part of a month. And for the whole month, you’re prolly one of those guys screaming “I GOT PAID” so they can steal a bit more, from your friends.

    This isn’t some game or a petty thief making beer money either. Look at the sums involved in some of these big ponzi schemes. Tens of Millions of Dollars. Some of it goes to drug dealers laundering their money. SOme ends up in the hands of terrorists to make a bomb here or there, maybe blow up a nursery? This isn’t even hypothetical, this money has been traced to some pretty dark and evil places, but where not ONE DIME of it has ever been traced so far, is to a legitimate business that makes real profits in commerce.

    You saying some people make good money on these programs, I say some people get something between “receiving stolen goods” to outright theft.

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  3. Help me understand why the scammers always show up crying when the ‘program’ is almost totally collapsed on itself as they all eventually do. You got in too late. You’re not getting your money back. Sue your ‘sponsor’ for it.

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  4. It’s more like “Start with 10 dollars and turn it into a Felony”

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  5. “Give JBP a chance to prove itself and understand the entire system and what it does before throwing it to the dogs.”

    I think we understand it enough.

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  6. Whip: Help me understand why the scammers always show up crying when the ‘program’ is almost totally collapsed on itself as they all eventually do. You got in too late. You’re not getting your money back. Sue your ‘sponsor’ for it.

    From the way he talk, he knows “the deal”.

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  7. I will attempt an answer to Mike (1st commenter).

    Mike: Help me understand something here.Why is it that when a unique program like
    JBP/JSS Tripler comes along…

    SNIPPED

    Give JBP a chance to prove itself and understand the entire system and what it does before throwing it to the dogs.

    It is NOT “a unique program”.
    There have been many, MANY programs like this before and they have ALL ended with most of the people who paid in to them being cheated out of their money.

    Giving it a chance “to prove itself” is NOT needed, simple arithmetic proves beyond any doubt that it is unsustainable. It WILL eventually end. There are various ways it could end. It could continue until it collapses, it could be that the people running it close it down and run with the money or it could be shut down by law enforcement.

    If it “continue until it collapses”

    The money paid out comes from people paying in.

    Everybody that pays in gets more paid out than they paid in.

    More money being paid out requires more new money coming in.

    More new money coming IN requires even MORE new money coming to come IN to cover pay outs.

    Eventually the amount of new money coming IN slows down and dries up (the number of people that can be recruited is NOT infinite).

    When payments IN is not enough to cover payments OUT the scheme collapses.

    When it collapses the vast majority of people who paid in will lose their money.

    If “the people running it close it down and run with the money”

    This is the most common end. The owner either sees the eventual end approaching or they are satisfied with the money they have scammed and they just disappear with the money.

    When the people running it close it down and run with the money, the vast majority of people who paid in will lose their money.

    If it is “shut down by law enforcement”

    This does not happen often enough. I can understand why, simple lack of resources to investigate the multitude of scam sites that infest our planet.

    When it is shut down by law enforcement, the vast majority of people who paid in will lose their money.

    The bottom line is…

    the vast majority of people who paid in to these schemes WILL lose their money.

    Thom

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  8. The sad part is some people are trying to “time” the HYIPs and hope to get out before the collapse.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-17428613

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  9. Another one from “Anonymous” at 9:18 a.m. He’s trying to dial up the menacing and chill me . . .

    Hasn’t submitted anything on topic yet — just the usual deflections and bids to chill — all in “defense” of an obvious Ponzi scheme that deliberately targets U.S. residents (and citizens of other countries) and routes their money through a collection of four offshore processors well-known for enabling international fraud schemes.

    I’m still working on a story about JSS/JBP that’s going to report that the conference calls are getting more and more political in tone and that Frederick Mann preemptively is suggesting a government “raid” cannot be ruled out:

    “There are bureaucrats who sometimes behave like predators, and they don’t care about legal niceties if they decide to raid a company,” Mann told conference-call listeners last week.

    Meanwhile, it has become clear that some JSS/JBP members are worried that the purported “opportunity” is cherry-picking new members and/or misdirecting credit for new signups by telling prospects to enter a “random” sponsor ID.

    There also is a purported backlog of more than 160,000 “position” placements — even as some members openly are complaining about not getting paid and getting incomprehensible responses from “support” and meaningless answers on conference calls.

    The call host — a female named “Dale” — actually has laughed/chortled at callers who’ve raised legitimate questions/issues. In typical HYIP fashion, Fred and Dale are playing dumb on some of the issues. The vomitous disingenuousness fairly reeks from the calls.

    One member — “Potato” from “California” — was an early JSS/JBP enthusiast who chummed up with Mann during the calls. But he appears to be turning into a critic because he can’t get his questions answered to his satisfaction about why he is not getting paid. (This after he suggested in earlier calls that he might enroll his grandchildren in another state.)

    http://patrickpretty.com/2012/02/27/special-report-domain-registered-to-purported-jss-tripler-operator-features-videos-of-sovereign-citizen-accused-in-alleged-alaska-murder-plot-against-public-officials-meanwhile-americans-listen/

    It has become clear that some JSS/JBP members are managing accounts for new enlistees, something that brings even more securities-related concerns into play. Not only are the members selling unregistered securities as investment contracts and acting as broker/dealers, they also are managing accounts. That’s a HUGE RED FLAG — not that the other issues are not bright red.

    Some members also appear to be managing payment-processing accounts for enlistees. If that’s the case, it likely means that Americans are drafting other Americans into opening accounts with offshore processors so the sponsors can qualify for commissions — and then managing BOTH the processing accounts AND the JSS/JBP accounts. Those things open the door to spectacular abuses, including identity theft and outright theft of funds — and creating monumental tax problems for enlistees across national borders.

    All the U.S. government needs to show to put this “program” in a world of hurt is that these things have happened to ONE senior citizen, regardless of where that senior resides.

    That’s what happened in the Dennis Bolze Ponzi and fraud scheme in Tennessee. The scheme reached into Europe, victimized a senior and put Bolze in prison for 27+ years.

    http://patrickpretty.com/2012/01/10/editorial-recuiting-seniors-into-your-downline-why-ponzi-forum-purveyors-and-pimps-should-pay-attention-to-dennis-bolzes-failed-bid-to-have-his-27-year-prison-sentence-reduced/

    The regulatory bodies of any number of nations could act against JSS/JBP in a heartbeat.

    It remains unclear whether Mann is a “sovereign citizen.” But this much can be said: “Sovereigns” often draft both knowing and unknowing others into fraud schemes. A legal calamity often ensues, and the unknowing may get victimized twice — first with the loss of funds and, later, with the need to spend money to hire a lawyer.

    JSS/JBP is an emerging menace. It is indefensible in any rational, real-word way — and that’s one of the reasons the apologists and “defenders” engage in their pathetic bids to chill the messenger.

    Patrick

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