Zeek Rewards MLM Says Affiliates Must Cash Checks ‘Immediately’ Because It Is Closing Accounts At 2 U.S. Banks

On Memorial Day, U.S.-based Zeek Rewards announced it was closing its "old" bank accounts in the United States and opening a new account at a bank it did not name.

UPDATED 8:18 A.M. EDT (MAY 29, U.S.A.) In a curious Memorial Day announcement placed below a representation of the American flag, the Zeek Rewards MLM “program” told affiliates they must cash commission checks “immediately” because Zeek is switching banks.

“Zeek is currently in the process of moving to a bank that can handle our growing needs and while in transition will be closing our old accounts with both New Bridge Bank and BB & T,” Zeek said on its news Blog. “Please be sure to deposit or cash any commission checks immediately so they clear before June 1st, 2012 or they will be returned to you with ‘account closed’ and will need to be reissued.”

Zeek did not identify its new bank. Nor did the purported “opportunity” say why its old banks could not handle its needs and whether its new bank operated on U.S. soil.

Both New Bridge and BB&T are FDIC-member banks operating in North Carolina. Zeek is a purported arm of Rex Venture Group LLC, which conducts business in North Carolina.

Zeek says it conducts business with offshore payment processors such as AlertPay (now Payza) and SolidTrustPay. Both AlertPay and SolidTrustPay have been criticized for being friendly to dubious businesses if not outright scams such as investment programs operating in disguise, HYIPs, autosurfs and cycler matrices.

Zeek affiliates, meanwhile, have a presence on well-known Ponzi-scheme forums such as TalkGold and MoneyMakerGroup, which has led to questions about whether proceeds from any number of fraud schemes could be passing through Zeek. Today alone Italian authorities announced advertising bans against at least three “programs” that either have or had a presence on the Ponzi boards. The “programs” included JSS Tripler, which purports to pay a daily return of 2 percent; Ricochet Riches, which advertised a daily return of at least 2 percent; and Macro Trade,  which advertised a daily payout rate of between 1.2 percent and 2.2 percent. A entity known as “System Explosion” also was referenced today in an investor warning by CONSOB, the Italian securities regulator.

Although Zeek insists it is not an investment program, its reported daily payout rate of between 1 percent and 2 percent is consistent with the returns advertised by numerous online scams.

Two days ago, British journalist Tony Hetherington of the Daily Mail wrote about a purported program known as Royalty 7 that was advertising a daily return of 7 percent. Royalty 7 also has a presence on the Ponzi boards, and a PP Blog reader — “Tony” — reported today that the U.K. Financial Services Authority warned on May 22 that Royalty 7 was an unauthorized firm.

“Finance Your Dream Ltd trading as Royalty7.com is not authorised under the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (FSMA) to carry on a regulated activity in the UK,” FSA warned. “Regulated activities include, among other things, accepting deposits by way of business.”

Separately, the Isle of Man Financial Supervision Commission also issued a warning about Royalty7.

Royalty7 — like Zeek, JSS Tripler and scores of other programs that either plant the seed that outsize returns are possible or outright advertise returns that correspond to annualized returns in the hundreds of percent — advertises that it uses AlertPay and SolidTrustPay as  payment processors.

The Zeek Rewards MLM program is married to a penny-auction site known as Zeekler.

“Win Cash!” Zeekler roars to bidders. “Funds will be sent to the winner by SolidTrust Pay or AlertPay.”

Zeek’s apparent reliance on processors that are the darlings of global fraudsters has resulted in a bizarre condition under which Zeekler effectively is using U.S. currency as an auction “product” no different than a TV set while advertising that successful bidders for sums of cash can receive their winnings through offshore processors linked to fraud scheme after fraud scheme.

Successful Zeekler bidders are told to “please send a note to [Zeekler] customer support requesting SolidTrust Pay or AlertPay” to receive their cash winnings.

Despite Zeek’s claim it is not an investment program, it has been presented as such online by its own affiliates. Affiliates claim they’ve earned gains that correspond to an annualized return of more than  500 percent and that Zeek has a feature that makes “compounding” possible.

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30 Responses to “Zeek Rewards MLM Says Affiliates Must Cash Checks ‘Immediately’ Because It Is Closing Accounts At 2 U.S. Banks”

  1. Uh Oh, compulsory “Suspicious Activity Reports” strike again.

    One wonders if all the little Zeeklers will point their collective fingers at the banks like the AdSurfers’ did.

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  2. Adland’s Person of The Year and other Scamland serial fraud promoters should also read what you have to say about Royalty7 which is also pimped all over Scamland.

    http://community.adlandpro.com/forums/post/2530399/Royalty7-Finance-Your-Dream.aspx

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  3. Quick note: This story from December 2011 on how the name of Rex Venture Group somehow started appearing on the website of the purported Text Cash Network “opportunity” may add some context to the various flaps in which MLMs sometimes find themselves:

    http://patrickpretty.com/2011/12/27/update-text-cash-network-creates-even-more-name-confusion-with-assignment-clause-that-appeared-on-purchase-agreement-page/

    For whatever reason, TCN — which had ties to serial scammer Phil Piccolo of Data Network Affiliates and OWOW infamy (among others) — claimed this:

    “I understand that this agreement may not be transferred or assigned without prior written consent of REX Venture Group, LLC a/k/a/ T.C.N..com (sic), which consent shall not be unreasonably denied.”

    That claim later went missing and was changed to this:

    “I understand that this agreement may not be transferred or assigned without prior written consent of Text Cash Network, inc. a/k/a T.C.N., which consent shall not be unreasonably denied.”

    So, these questions emerge: Did TCN simply copy and paste information from Rex Ventures and place it on the TCN website — or did TCN and Rex have some sort of business relationship, including a banking relationship?

    There is just all kinds of strangeness within this particular sphere of MLM.

    Piccolo once threatened to sue Troy Dooly because of what he was saying about DNA. Over time, this resulted in a guest appearance by Piccolo on Troy’s radio show in which Piccolo went on and on about “millions” and other drivel.

    Even as Piccolo was planting the seed that he was a man of faith, he wanted his critics to know he had the ability to sue them back to the Stone Age — but that he might not sue because he was a man of God.

    That same man of God later suggested that he could bring in leg-breakers if his critics made too much noise.

    Troy, unfortunately, did not ask Piccolo a single question about DNA in 90 minutes of air time (60 minutes live/30 minutes recorded off the air).

    Later, TCN comes to the fore — pushed by the same nonsense that had driven both DNA and OWOW.

    I did a story on the FBI stopping a Thanksgiving weekend bombing plot in Portland, Ore.

    For whatever reason, that story separated a Piccolo apologist from his senses — and he advanced various conspiracy theories and more or less accused me of being a spy for Israel.

    http://patrickpretty.com/2010/11/29/owow-defender-and-phil-piccolo-apologist-demands-to-know-if-pp-blog-is-israeli-says-blog-spreads-islamophobia-and-that-terror-scares-are-fake-suggests-cover-up-followed-911-attacks/

    http://patrickpretty.com/2010/11/21/egg-themed-domains-used-to-promote-hyips-that-flushed-hundreds-of-millions-of-dollars-go-missing-plus-an-update-on-data-network-affiliates-amid-suggestion-thyroid-cancer-sufferers-can-benefit-from/

    Patrick

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  4. It perhaps also is worth noting that some Zeek affiliates are using the same company that produced a bizzare ad for the “Narc That Car” program.

    Like DNA, Narc surely was one of the strangest MLM schemes of all time. The (apparent) idea was that banks needed help in repossessing cars in the aftermath of the severe recession that hit the United States and much of the world in 2008 — and carried over into 2009 and 2010.

    Notwithstanding the fact the MLMs often position themselves as the champions of the poor and the hurting, Narc launched a scheme that in a sense was counter to that message — i.e., get rich by helping the repo man.

    This was to be accomplished through a process by which Narc would send out an army of MLMers to write down the license-plate numbers of cars parked in their neighborhoods and in the parking lots of restaurants, supermarkets and Big Box retailers.

    Narc then would record in its database the plate numbers and addresses at which these cars had been spotted by the MLM army — and make the info available to the repo man on the chance that the car was “wanted” by the repo man and he couldn’t grab it at the defaulting borrower’s home.

    The scheme became even more mindless when it tried to tie itself to the national AMBER Alert program for rescuing abducted children. Before long, some Narc affiliates were claiming that law enforcement was using the Narc program and that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security could use it to locate terrorists.

    The BBB raised pyramid-scheme questions about Narc, and MLM’s Kool-Aid wing came out of the woodwork to “defend” the scheme. Various TV stations did reports on Narc, and the Kool-Aid wing went after them, too.

    In any event, the company now producing ads for the Zeek “program” did an ad for Narc that demonized an attractive young woman dubbed “Rena the Realtor,” who, according to the script, was ducking the repo man while getting toned at the gym.

    A Narc MLM affiliate who had the bearing of a cop just happened to record Rena’s license number while her car was parked at the gym — and the repo man sweeps in with a tow-truck and de-cars the scamming Rena.

    The video displayed scores of cars backed up during Rush Hour — each one of them with a dollar sign superimposed. The video also implied that a Narc sponsor will give prospects their first 10 plate numbers to enter into the system — if the prospect did not have time to get 10 on his or her own.

    Memory Lane:

    http://patrickpretty.com/2010/03/15/video-promo-for-narc-that-car-demonizes-sweet-faced-rena-the-realtor-some-reps-said-to-make-more-money-than-president-of-united-states/

    Patrick

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  5. I am a Zeek affiliate. After watching a video on memorial day http://mlmhelpdesk.com/mlm-penny-auction-alert-zeek-rewards-affiliates-must-deposit-commission-checks-now-rcd-update/

    Our current bank cannot handle the amount of business we are bringing in. I joined on March 27th and from my understanding at that time I was among approx 320k other affiliates. Now I have been told we have more than doubled in the last 60 days to over 700k+ affiliates. Our new bank is located in Hong Kong. I wont say what I have made or collected but I will say from a 1st time Novice MLM affiliate, I encourage anyone that is looking at Zeek to investigate it from a bias and non-bias prospective outlook and to never just trust what a person says online or in person. Many people believe because they read it online that it must be true.

    I did my homework for over 2 months on Zeek Rewards and my goal while doing the research was to put holes in it and bring it down because it was too good to be true. Corporate CEO’s make $50 million a year, do they deserve it? Did they earn it with blood sweat and tears? In my opinion, No! And I am a business owner. I will say I have made/collected my initial money back and I will say I am a happy camper. If I can help anyone understand the Zeek Rewards program I invite you to email me [Deleted by PP Blog.]

    I wish you all a great year and a wonderful life. Thank you for keeping folks up to date on would be scams out there. Zeek is the real deal folks and I am proof of that.

    Christopher Fields
    Grantsville, Utah /Owner Com-Tek Services

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  6. Christopher,

    I understand that you’re excited about Zeek. But please don’t use this space to publish an email address and “invite” people to contact you.

    Also: Just because you are getting paid does not mean that Zeek is on the up-and-up. There is way more to it than that.

    Let me ask you a question: Does it strike you as odd that U.S.-based Zeek — using the American flag on Memorial Day — used its news Blog to announce it was closing two U.S. bank accounts and that affiliates had to cash their checks “immediately?”

    You are now claiming that Zeek’s “new bank” is located in Hong Kong. Does that not strike you as odd, given the fact that Zeek is wrapping itself in the American flag, auctioning U.S. currency and telling winning bidders they can get their money through offshore processors?

    Just a suggestion, but you might want to do a little research on AlertPay and SolidTrustPay. You also might want to familiarize yourself with the AdSurfDaily Ponzi case and the issues in play in that case, including the moving of money to offshore venues.

    Patrick

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  7. Our current bank cannot handle the amount of business we are bringing in.

    That’s gotta be the funniest line in the whole charade. Like somehow there aren’t far BIGGER,legitimate companies using the same bank.

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  8. Christopher Fields: Our current bank cannot handle the amount of business we are bringing in.

    Here is part of what BB&T, one of Zeek’s claimed U.S. banks, has to say about itself:

    “BB&T Corporation, headquartered in Winston-Salem, N.C., is among the nation’s top financial-holding companies with $174.8 billion in assets. Its bank subsidiaries operate approximately 1,800 financial centers in the Carolinas, Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Georgia, Tennessee, Maryland, Florida, Alabama, Indiana, Texas and Washington, D.C. BB&T ranks in market share: No. 1 in West Virginia; No. 3 in the Carolinas and Virginia; No. 4 in Kentucky and Alabama; No. 5 in Florida and Georgia; No. 6 in Tennessee; No. 7 in Maryland and Washington, D.C. (FDIC market share reported as of June 30, 2011)”

    http://bbt.mediaroom.com/index.php?s=22714&cat=2073

    Here is part of what New Bridge, another Zeek-claimed bank, says about itself:

    “NewBridge Bank is a full-service, state-chartered community bank headquartered in Greensboro, North Carolina and is one of the largest community banks in the state. NewBridge Bank serves small to midsize businesses, professionals and consumers with a comprehensive array of financial services, including retail and commercial banking, private banking, wealth management, and mortgage banking. NewBridge Bank has assets of approximately $1.7 billion with 39 locations throughout North Carolina. The stock of NewBridge Bancorp, the Bank’s parent company, trades on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “NBBC.”

    http://www.newbridgebank.com/company/about/principles.aspx

    Patrick

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  9. It’s a distraction. “True Believers” will believe in the PR spin. We skeptics aren’t so easily fooled.

    Any one got one of the new checks yet? It’d be easy to spot which bank did they REALLY use by checking the routing number. I am guessing it’s HSBC.

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  10. I wouldn’t mind betting it has more to do with US banks being required to file Suspicious Activity Reports than it does to do with the banks being unable to handle the volume of business.

    Either that, or the whole thing is just another red herring being thrown out to explain away payment delays.

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  11. OK, here’s the puzzle piece I can’t seem to make fit, why the June 1st cut off?

    Imagine it’s true that more digital dollars were flowing than Zeek’s current bank’s computers could handle and they need to move to another bank, I mean when you put it like that it makes it sound kinda silly, but I did say “imagine.” But OK, they need to move to another bank what could possibly keep them from keeping enough cash in the old accounts to cover all checks written against them? The announcement should have read “starting June 1st all checks will be issued from a new account, please cash checks from the old account at your soonest possible convenience.” That’s how a sensible buisness would handle this.

    Today’s Zeek Rewards News has a post

    Zeek Rewards News: Hello Fine People,

    As you know, we are currently in the process of transferring accounts to our new banks. While we will be able to resume check runs when the transfers are finalized, we do not want to cause any additional delay to our affiliates who are waiting for their May 21st or 28th commission checks. Therefore we are going to be issuing a claw-back of all requested checks into a special Zeek portal where any affiliate who is awaiting a physical check can instead choose their preferred eWallet for their commission payment. All three fully integrated eWallets (below) will be made available for this and future paydays.

    NXPay
    SolidTrust Pay
    AlertPay

    First off, I’m encouraged by the fact that someone over there knows about “claw backs,” it should prove to be one conversation their attorney can’t later bill them for. But this “claw back” issue is darn strange. Call me a cynic but isn’t it starting to look more like their inability to cash checks drawn on their previous accounts not a voluntary situation? If I recall my ASD timeline correctly wasn’t a report filed by a bank which refused to do buisness with Andy pretty much the first tangible knock at his house of cards?

    We know ZR will lie their asses off to avoid admitting an embarrassing truth. Almost none of the ZR members in April’s purge had anything to do with the fraud that was crippling the system and Paul knew that when whole countries were banned but it fit in with the story he was telling and he knew as long as people were getting paid they’d stop caring about thousands of members just like them who got kicked to the curb for a cover story.

    Now it seems like the banking infrastructure in the United States is insufficient to handle ZR’s transactions and no existing check written by the company will be honored after tomorrow. I’ve heard of several companies who have had just as bizarre and byzantine banking issues as ZR but following online HYIPs and ponzies is kinda like a hobby, I’ve never seen a legitimate company being run like this.

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  12. This reminded me of PIPS when Bryan Marsden had to scramble to find a bank to handle their payments when their banking relationship went south. He didn’t want to answer the questions the Central Bank was asking about the wire transfers, so his excuse was the banks could not handle “all the money” that was being wired into their bank accounts and payments going out. Only problem was he was dealing with the largest bank in Malaysia.

    If Paul follows this script, look for him to announce they will be starting their own bank in the near future because the banks cannot handle the amount of their business.

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  13. This is the bit where it gets nasty for “members” who genuinely believe they’ve struck gold.

    The “usual suspect” HYIP ponzi players have been tipped off, have cashed out and are on to the “next big thing” while the newbies are stuck between a rock and a hard place.

    The CANNOT cash out.

    All they can do is sit, watch and wait.

    DejaVu, all over again.

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  14. I’m betting their banks have closed their accounts, either for chargebacks associated with their “little fraud problem” or suspicious activity. When you close your account yourself, you pretty much control the timing of that event, you leave enough in the account to cover the amount of checks you have written. When the bank tells you “after X date we will no longer do business with you” then you have to scramble and tell everyone to hurry up and cash the checks. Given the timing of when they announced it, look for more than a few people to have their checks returned NSF or “Account Closed” because even though they deposited them before June 1st, they didn’t clear in time.

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  15. GlimDropper: OK, here’s the puzzle piece I can’t seem to make fit, why the June 1st cut off?

    And why the announcement on May 28, a national holiday? Lots of people would miss that announcement. I’m wondering if it was limited to the Zeek Blog or also was conveyed in a mass email by Zeek to Zeek affiliates. There was very little margin for error if Zeek wanted people to deposit those checks before June 1.

    As you point out, the rush leads to questions about why Zeek provided such a narrow window and why Zeek perceived some advantage in having those checks deposited by June 1.

    Let’s assume Zeek voluntarily closed its “old” accounts because it knew it was switching banks and was in no danger of overdrawing its accounts when it issued commission checks on May 21 and May 28 on its “old” accounts. From a banking standpoint, the “worst” that could happen to Zeek is that its accounts would be debited for the amount of the checks, thus shrinking its balance — as would be expected in the absence of new deposits.

    But if the banks booted Zeek and issued Zeek, say, a cashier’s check for all/most/much of the balance in the “old” accounts, then Zeek potentially has a problem because of the outstanding checks it has written.

    It is very reasonable for Zeek affiliates to ask the “opportunity” whether the “old” accounts were closed voluntarily by Zeek or whether the banks closed the accounts on their own initiative. It also is reasonable to ask Zeek how the “old” banks made it whole (cashier’s check?) — or whether Zeek preemptively sought to make itself whole by moving large sums out of the “old” banks to a “new” bank, thus potentially creating an overdraft condition when the commissions checks began to stream into the “old” banks.

    It is interesting that Zeek named both of its “old” banks — but not the new one.

    GlimDropper: Imagine it’s true that more digital dollars were flowing than Zeek’s current bank’s computers could handle and they need to move to another bank, I mean when you put it like that it makes it sound kinda silly, but I did say “imagine.” But OK, they need to move to another bank what could possibly keep them from keeping enough cash in the old accounts to cover all checks written against them? The announcement should have read “starting June 1st all checks will be issued from a new account, please cash checks from the old account at your soonest possible convenience.” That’s how a sensible buisness would handle this.

    I think your analysis of this is spot-on.

    And I also think the U.S. banks were smart if they said no to Zeek’s business under these murky conditions. They surely are aware of this case:

    http://patrickpretty.com/2011/04/27/urgent-bulletin-moving-keith-simmons-forex-ponzi-caper-leads-to-criminal-charges-and-deferred-prosecution-against-north-carolina-bank-communityone-bank-charged-with-not-maintaining-effective/

    It’s the Keith Simmons/”Black Diamond” Ponzi scheme case. Venue? North Carolina.

    Zeek’s business structure could be an issue: For example, Zeek has two arms — Zeek Rewards (MLM) and Zeekler (auction). These arms purportedly are part of Rex Venture Group, which has a footprint in both North Carolina and Nevada, and Zeek also ties itself to an entity known as Lighthouse America.

    Zeek’s website explanations about the interconnectivity of these entities is far from clear, and the newest entities — Zeek Rewards and Zeekler — appear to be the revenue turbines. Throw in the reliance on offshore payment processors, and the mix becomes even murkier.

    There also is the curious matter of Zeek’s seeming political tone-deafness and bizarre approach to PR. Among other things, it has preemptively denied it is a pyramid scheme, felt the need to claim Social Security is a “legal” pyramid scheme and seemed to have a need to author some sort of tortured, preemptive explanation about why so much money flows to the top of “pyramidal structure[s]” — whether MLM or not.

    http://patrickpretty.com/2012/05/22/editorial-stepfords-at-the-gate-zeek-trots-out-social-security-argument-in-preemptive-pyramid-scheme-denial-auction-site-makes-its-bizarre-case-with-exclamation-points/

    The most generous phrase I can think think of right now to describe Zeek’s public utterings is “insular thinking.” It may work on Zeek’s figurative island (in inland North Carolina) while having the temporary effect of keeping many or most of its fellow islanders happy or on message, but the message reads like bad fiction when its viewed through a real-world lens.

    It seems as though the more lawyers/consultants Zeek hires, the louder its fellow islanders cheer.

    Add to this oddity the presence of some of AdSurfDaily’s more celebrated apologists, and the situation devolves into yet another ASD-like black comedy.

    Two of Zeek’s affiliates — Todd Disner and Dwight Owen Schweitzer — were ASD mainstays who actually sued the government for its alleged misdeeds in the ASD case. The government has moved for dismissal, based in part on Andy Bowdoin’s guilty plea May 18.

    Prior to Bowdoin’s guilty plea, Disner and Schweitzer showed a federal judge the opinions of Gerald Nehra and Keith Laggos that ASD was not a Ponzi scheme. But Bowdoin now admits he presided over a Ponzi, putting him at odds with his own experts and putting Disner and Schweitzer at odds with both Bowdoin and the experts.

    The Nehra law firm and Laggos now are part of the Zeek story. The islanders seem to be overjoyed about that. But Nehra didn’t do ASD much good in the courtroom, and Laggos has a bit of SEC baggage to carry around, so their effectiveness off the Zeek island is in doubt.

    GlimDropper: If I recall my ASD timeline correctly wasn’t a report filed by a bank which refused to do buisness with Andy pretty much the first tangible knock at his house of cards?

    A Florida bank closed a Bowdoin account amid Ponzi concerns.

    It is not widely known, but some of the money from Golden Panda — the purported ASD “Chinese” option led by onetime alleged prime-bank swindler Walter Clarence Busby Jr. — ended up in a Georgia bank that failed.

    http://patrickpretty.com/2011/04/15/fdic-georgia-authorities-shut-down-bank-that-once-held-proceeds-from-alleged-asdgolden-panda-ad-builder-scheme/

    Patrick

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  16. Zeek Rewards = USA

    Zeekler = USA

    Suspicious Activity Reports = USA

    Bank Secrecy Act = USA

    When ASD was closed down, the Federal task force that did so already had ASDs financial details..including account numbers and totals.

    Coincidence ???

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  17. It’s also worth noting that Full Tilt Poker, which was charged by US Attorneys in September 2011 as a Ponzi scheme, also involved payment processors in various foreign countries.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904106704576582741398633386.html

    In the article, it says that the online poker sites moved out of the US and process payments outside the US mainly due to crackdown of Federal authorities using the UIGEA, making it illegal for financial institutions in the US to process money related to online gambling.

    Now ZR is moving their payment processing out of the country to some bank in Hong Kong. Coincidence? Unlikely.

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  18. Quick note: A would-be poster calling himself/herself “phelix” has submitted copy-and-paste comments in two separate Zeek threads that assert (caps added):

    “Here is a good review about zeek BEING a ponzi scheme.”

    But the link included in the copy-and-paste post leads to a site that purports to explain why Zeek is not a Ponzi scheme.

    I cannot tell if these would-be posts come from a Zeek fan or critic — or if it represents the “work” of a Zeek affiliate who is trying to trying to spam the PP Blog with his/her talking points for Zeek.

    “phelix” is welcome to post here regardless of his/her point of view about Zeek. But I am not going to approve any backdoor spam bids, so the posts from “phelix” remain unpublished.

    Note to “phelix”: I’ll publish your posts no matter what side of the issue you’re on if you make it clear you’re not just out to spam multiple Zeek threads here with Zeek talking points.

    Patrick

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  19. admin: Quick note: A would-be poster calling himself/herself “phelix” has submitted copy-and-paste comments in two separate Zeek threads that assert (caps added):“Here is a good review about zeek BEING a ponzi scheme.”But the link included in the copy-and-paste post leads to a site that purports to explain why Zeek is not a Ponzi scheme.

    He spammed it on my hub as well. I wrote a rebuttal. The spammer is Ryan Perry out of Boise Idaho, rperry on Zeekrewards.

    http://amlmskeptic.blogspot.com/2012/06/self-review-fakery-how-one-fake-review.html

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  20. Patrick, you wrote:

    “There also is the curious matter of Zeek’s seeming political tone-deafness and bizarre approach to PR. Among other things, it has preemptively denied it is a pyramid scheme, felt the need to claim Social Security is a “legal” pyramid scheme and seemed to have a need to author some sort of tortured, preemptive explanation about why so much money flows to the top of “pyramidal structure[s]” — whether MLM or not.”

    And I say that’s because…..

    “He who smelt it, dealt it.”

    Warmly,

    Moose

    Major, United States Air Force (Retired)

    Combat Veteran; Pilot

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