Email From A Concerned WCM777 Participant Raises Prospect That Worries Are Being Ignored

EDITOR’S NOTE: UPDATED 6:15 P.M. ET U.S.A. WCM777, now known as Kingdom777, is an outrageous fraud scheme operating over the Internet that has penetrated multiple countries, including the United States. Some affiliates claim a payment of $14,000 returns $500,000 in a year. The purported head is “Dr. Phil Ming Xu.” Please use the Blog’s search function for more info on WCM777.

For starters, see: SPECIAL REPORT: WCM777 Says Its U.S. Operations ‘Will Be On Hold Until Further Notice’ Because Its Securities Sales ‘Failed To Fully Comply With Laws And Regulations In United States’ — But Will The ‘WCM 777 Boston’ Band Play On In Houston? And What About The Highly Curious ‘Joseph Global Institute?’

Here is an email received by the PP Blog today from a WCM777 participant who is deeply worried. The email was sent from a U.S. state that has a considerable Latino population. Other than the carriage returns we added and the name we withheld, the email is verbatim.

__________________________

As far as I know our Hispanic Team Leader said we have 3 options, 1 is change address to a different country, 2 is transfer to a different name but in a foreign country and 3rd to just wait for the USA to close it down and we can request for reimbursement for every unit we have.

All what I know is from my team leader. I Log in under affiliate with my password but there is no answers to my questions. All we want is our money back because the money we invested is what we have save all this long past year’s and I have 4 kids, 2 teenagers that are very close to start college. I need help to find out on how we can get our money back. I herd many comments in the meeting but I talk for my myself. Please help!!

Sincerely

[Name Withheld by PP Blog]

About the Author

4 Responses to “Email From A Concerned WCM777 Participant Raises Prospect That Worries Are Being Ignored”

  1. Quick note: Have received a very disturbing email from a person who describes herself as a WCM777 recruit who signed up two others.

    She said her enroller assured her it was legal and safe and, based on those representations, she enrolled woman in her 80s and a friend who has chronic health problems.

    Based on info in this email, I’m given to believe that the woman is a person of faith. In any event, she says “We have not been able to recover part of our investment.”

    See this PP Blog story:

    http://patrickpretty.com/2013/10/30/churches-may-be-at-risk-from-wcm777-program-congregants-in-rialto-calif-may-have-been-swept-into-bizarre-cross-border-scheme-youtube-pitchman-says-venture-will-go-into-selling-shares-pre-i/

    It’s also worth noting that there are SEC offices in Los Angeles, San Fransisco and Boston — and that state regulators in Massachusetts moved against WCM777 last year.

    http://www.sec.gov/contact/addresses.htm

    Patrick

      (Quote)

  2. It’s so depressing to read the misfortunes of people who were either never given the most basic of information about real-world economics or who allowed blind greed to stifle their common sense … and then to consider how many millions more of them are yet to be taken to the cleaners.

      (Quote)

  3. shipdit: It’s so depressing to read the misfortunes of people who were either never given the most basic of information about real-world economics or who allowed blind greed to stifle their common sense … and then to consider how many millions more of them are yet to be taken to the cleaners.

    WCM777 almost has put me at a loss for words, SD. The story is so bizarre that it’s hard to cover. At the same time, it is abundantly clear that WCM777 was positioned as an excellent choice for people of faith and even entire congregations.

    I think the “program” was set up deliberately to steer people to the $2,000 buy-in level and that considerable brand-leeching occurred to sanitize it — these being the brands of Christianity itself and the brands of famous companies such as Siemens and Apple.

    Of course, the institution of the U.S. Presidency also was used.

    Looks as though there’s a considerable concentration of members in Massachusetts, Texas and California, very likely including people who might use a hyphen or demographic category when describing themselves: Brazilian-American, Asian-American and Latino/Latina, for instance.

    I join you in your depression over this one.

    Patrick

      (Quote)

  4. Kinda reminds me of Nanci Jo Frasier… But her population is not hyphenated, is it?

      (Quote)

Leave a Reply