BULLETIN: CLAIM: Former CIA Operative Was Paid More Than $400,000 By Companies Linked To WCM Ponzi Scheme

breakingnews72UPDATED 9:44 P.M. EDT MARCH 14 U.S.A. How strange were things in the universe of WCM777, an MLM “program” accused by the SEC last year of pulling off an $80 million, cross-border Ponzi swindle?

Would you believe that a former CIA operative with two felony convictions ended up on the payroll?

Robert Sensi, the former operative, received $403,000 from companies linked to WCM777, according to an amended lawsuit filed against Sensi in U.S. District Court for the Central District of California.

WCM777 was operated by Ming Xu of Temple City, Calif. A forensic accounting has determined that the WCM777 entities used 77 domestic bank accounts and 23 foreign ones, according to filings by court-appointed receiver Krista L. Freitag.

Sensi was paid six times through ToPacific Inc. and one time through World Capital Market Inc. between Jan 30 and March 25, 2014, according to court filings.

Alleged paymnets to Robert Sensi from WCM777-related firms. Source: Screen shot from federal court filing.

Alleged payments to Robert Sensi from WCM777-related firms. Source: Screen shot from federal court filing.

Freitag is suing Sensi for return of the money.  She initially sued him for the return of $385,000 (excluding interest and costs) in November 2014, alleging that he claimed he “used to work” for the CIA and was hired by WCM777-related companies to address complaints about the program by authorities in Peru, Taiwan and Dubai.  She further alleged that Sensi was “well aware” that various WCM777-related business were engaged in a Ponzi scheme.

Sensi responded to the November complaint on Feb. 9. He did not expressly deny Freitag’s claim that he had claimed to have worked for the CIA, but he did deny the allegations he’d been hired by the Xu entities to address the concerns about WCM777 in Peru, Taiwan and Dubai. He further denied he had knowledge of a Ponzi scheme.

In his answer, Sensi admitted “services were rendered pertaining to Peru, Taiwan, and Dubai.”  But he did not describe the services. On March 12, Freitag filed an amended complaint, asserting in the filing that Sensi had received $403,000 from the WCM777 entities, not the $385,000 specified in the original complaint.

Court records or published reports from the past two decades show that Sensi has been sentenced to prison twice — once for stealing millions of dollars from Kuwait Airways, a second time for a “Nigerian letters” scam in which a German businessman was swindled.

Larry J. Kolb, an author and former CIA agent, has written extensively about Sensi, his ties to the CIA and further ties to Republican politicians and Republican political causes, including fundraising.

Chapter 1 of “America at Night,” a 2007 book by Kolb, is available for free on Kolb’s website. The chapter references a meeting Kolb had in California with attorney “Vince Messina”  in May 2004.

A snippet (italics added):

Vince was late for lunch, and I wish he’d never shown up. But, then again, all indications are if Vince hadn’t sucked me back into the secret world, somebody else would’ve. So I don’t hold it against him. Vince Messina. Washington tax and immigration attorney, international dealmaker, bon vivant. Based on what I know of his background, he has to be as old as the hills. But somehow he doesn’t seem it. Bald on top, short dark hair on the sides, olive skin, smiles a lot, constantly on the move. Vince is on the up and up, but spends much of his time in strange lands working for mysterious clients.

During the lunch meeting, Messina asked Kolb if he knew Sensi, a somewhat startling question, Kolb wrote.

After Kolb answered yes, Messina called his nephew, Gary Messina, a U.S. Department of Homeland Security official, to enable Gary to listen in, Kolb wrote.

Ten years later, in May 2014, Vincent Messina would become a relief defendant in the WCM777 Ponzi case. The SEC alleged that Messina was WCM’s asserted “general counsel” and had come into possession of $5 million from the fraud scheme.

More than $941,000 of the $5 million went to International Market Ventures (IMV), a company operated by Gary Messina, according to court filings.

U.S. District Judge John F. Walter declared the $5 million that flowed to Vincent Messina “ill gotten” and ordered it disgorged. IMV was held jointly liable with Vincent Messina for disgorgement of $941,505 of the $5 million sum.

 

 

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2 Responses to “BULLETIN: CLAIM: Former CIA Operative Was Paid More Than $400,000 By Companies Linked To WCM Ponzi Scheme”

  1. More updates to this case on the receivers site, including the sale of one of the golf courses and more properties purchased or partially purchased by the sister of PMX. Additional company names of Su E Wang which benefited from proceeds of the ponzi are also revealed.

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  2. LB: More updates to this case on the receivers site, including the sale of one of the golf courses and more properties purchased or partially purchased by the sister of PMX. Additional company names of Su E Wang which benefited from proceeds of the ponzi are also revealed.

    Thanks for this, LB.

    Patrick

      (Quote)

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