Data Network Affiliates (DNA) Changes Launch Date; Shares Vision Of Americans Recording License-Plate Numbers At Walmart, Doctors’ Offices; Now Praises AMBER Alert After Earlier Claiming Program Had ‘Astronomical’ Budget

UPDATED 10:53 P.M. ET (U.S.A.) Its domain name registered in the Cayman Islands, Data Network Affiliates (DNA) envisions an America in which members will record the license-plate number of the same cars multiple times a day as the vehicles move from destination to destination, a recorded company pitch says.

Meanwhile, the DNA countdown clock on its website now says the launch has been delayed. The countdown clock previously said the program would launch today, a date that was changed to a later date in February and now has been changed to March 1.

At the same time, the recording speaks glowingly of AMBER Alert, after an earlier recording suggested the famous child-protection system managed by the Justice Department was wasting taxpayers’ money. In the new recording, a pitchman says DNA has no affiliation with AMBER Alert, although the company continues to use its name in sales pitches, suggesting that DNA could provide AMBER Alert a helping hand.

“That’s a great, great system,” the pitchman said of AMBER Alert in the new recording. “We have no association with AMBER Alert.”

In an earlier recording, the same pitchman said, “I’m pretty sure you heard of AMBER Alert. It saved over 497 people. But guess what? AMBER Alert, I think, costs about over $100 million a year or some kind of astronomical number.”

Walmart, Target, Doctors’ Offices

The new recording includes remarks that the company’s aim was to create a database that tracked the movement of cars. A pitchman talked about a hypothetical “red corvette” being spotted at Walmart at noon, at a “doctor’s office” at 1 p.m. and somewhere else at 4 p.m. — with DNA members recording the plate number at all three locations.

Other pitchmen in the recording said DNA had soared to more than 25,000 members in only days and expected to recruit “millions.” One pitchman said he had sponsored more than 700 members and had an organization that contained more than 4,000.

Earlier in the recording, a pitchman also talked about recording plate numbers at Target, another major American retailer. He suggested that members “open up” their eyes when leaving stores to see a “couple hundred” cars parked in the lots.

His voice quieting briefly, the pitchman talked about writing down plate numbers in the parking lots, suggesting that some members might prefer to return to the privacy of their own cars before recording the numbers.

“If you want to be inconspicuous . . . you can do that, too,” he said. “Just look around you. Be more vigilant, and just take some information. If you can read and write, that’s it. Just jot down a license-plate tag.”

Recording license-plate numbers in the parking lots of major retailers, he said, “can lead to some serious financial wealth for you.”

No mention was made about whether DNA members needed the permission of major retailers or physicians to record the plate numbers of shoppers or patients.

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5 Responses to “Data Network Affiliates (DNA) Changes Launch Date; Shares Vision Of Americans Recording License-Plate Numbers At Walmart, Doctors’ Offices; Now Praises AMBER Alert After Earlier Claiming Program Had ‘Astronomical’ Budget”

  1. With both NarcThatCar and DNA now so far into the public domain that even the most underfunded and overworked Law Enforcement Agency couldn’t help but investigate, readers are warned to be prepared for another round of “it’s the evil gub’mnt interfering” and “keeping the little man down” and “it’s constitutional abuse” posts to flood this and other similar sites in the near future.

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  2. Not to mention claims that the companies are legit, becazuzse their lawyers say so. Now where have we heard that before?

    Does anyone still remember the “Legality Statement” put out by ASD’s rather large lawyer? I dont remember the Judge in the ASD case being very impressed by their expert witness ex Amway attorney Gerry Nehra either, in fact she implied that he was more of a help to the prosecution than ASD.

    Oh well.

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  3. alasycia: Not to mention claims that the companies are legit, becazuzse their lawyers say so.Now where have we heard that before?Does anyone still remember the “Legality Statement” put out by ASD’s rather large lawyer?I dont remember the Judge in the ASD case being very impressed by their expert witness ex Amway attorney Gerry Nehra either, in fact she implied that he was more of a help to the prosecution than ASD.Oh well.  

    I believe Nehra is the person that they are relying on in terms of ‘validation’. All I have seen is that ‘an attorney who had worked with Amway’ posted all over. But they seem too embarrassed to state who this alleged attorney is for some reason much like the many other false claims they make.

    Seems they are WAY behind the eight ball in terms of relevance anyway:

    http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/newsroom/pdfs/ambersecondarydist.pdf

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  4. I would also consider their ‘hypothetical’ as stalking.

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