How To Comment/Respond

ADDED FEB. 12, 2011: We’re pleased that readers take the time to comment on PP Blog posts and to reply to comments from other readers.

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Thank you.

Patrick

63 Responses to “How To Comment/Respond”

  1. To would-be poster “Stacy”:

    I am not publishing your would-be comments about the Patrick Cody Morgan case in this thread.

    I’ll review the comments and consider them for publication if you post them in either of these two threads:

    http://patrickpretty.com/2013/02/15/2-days-after-judge-cites-specific-web-domain-and-declares-kenneth-wayne-leaming-filing-undecipherable-pp-blog-receives-would-be-comment-with-link-to-page-that-references-same-domain-and-case-agai/

    http://patrickpretty.com/2012/11/02/jury-returns-verdicts-against-purported-texas-sovereign-citizen-in-less-than-3-hours-patrick-cody-morgan-potentially-faces-decades-in-jail-after-conspiracy-and-bank-fraud-convictions-in-condo-swi/

    The first time you tried to post a comment in this thread, well, it purported to be in response to a comment by a PP Blog reader nearly two years ago. That comment had nothing whatsoever to do with Patrick Cody Morgan. I treat such efforts as spam.

    Regardless, you’ve now returned to this thread, insisting I publish links you’ve spammed and that this Blog tell the “WHOLE story.”

    It’s simple: If you want to post about the bum rap you appear to believe Patrick Cody Morgan is getting, do so in the appropriate thread. Don’t try to turn the top of this Blog into a link farm for your spam.

    Patrick

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  2. Hello,

    My name is Dar and i am a journalist in Israel (at the Kolbotek Tv program).

    Kolbotek is the main invesigative Tv program at the Israeli channel 10 (a commercial broadcasting television channel).

    We are investigating the story of the Principality of New Utopia.

    We will appriciate your urgent help:
    As we saw, you have published in the past lots of information about the scam of New Utopia. Recently we got an info that one Israeli guy was involved in the “so called” principality of NU.

    I would kindly ask for your help with referring me to the sources and/or people who gave you the info regarding New Utopia and may help us too.

    Thanks alot.

    With kind regards,

    Dar at the name of the Kolboek team

    Channel 10

    +972-99566666

    kolbotek5090@gmail.com

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  3. Hello Dar,

    The public information the PP Blog has on New Utopia is available in the archives. You’ll find the search function near the upper-right corner. Simply type in “New Utopia” — without the quotes.

    As a brief update, “Prince” Lazarus Long reportedly has passed away.

    One of my memories about covering events related to New Utopia was a message I received from the purported “Protector” of the nonexistent, undersea nation.

    You’ll find that story here:

    http://patrickpretty.com/2011/03/10/pp-blog-operated-by-self-appointed-idiot-fan-of-nonexistent-nation-of-new-utopia-suggests-blog-invited-then-univited-to-ceremony-at-palace/

    New Utopia would make a fine story for Channel 10.

    Thank you for your note.

    Patrick

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  4. Dear Dar
    I am wondering, if you any work related to the one of the greatest scan Profitable Sunrise. If you have any tips and advises, please do share. I am a victim with 20+ downlines victimized and 10,000s of US$ in Roman Novac’s hands. Any assistance provided help 20+ and greately appreciated.
    Thank you
    Mathews Valliaveetil [deleted by PP Blog]

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  5. Mathews Valliaveetil: I am wondering, if you any work related to the one of the greatest scan Profitable Sunrise.

    http://patrickpretty.com/tag/profitablesunrise/

    Patrick

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  6. I am interested in hearing more about the FELMINA ALLIANCE scam, there are so many investors swindled worldwide and we have to submit complaints. One of the “companies” behind the FELMINA ALLIANCE scam is SLADBO BAUSERVICE Gmbh, based in Berlin, Germany.

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  7. SEC Filing against CKB Promoters

    The SEC was right to move against many of those individuals charged in it’s Oct 2013 filing for making highly deceptive claims of profitablility from the growth of “PRPT”. The SEC was only partially correct to state in its filing “PTPT” is worthless. Investors were able to convert PRPT to shares of stock to be issued in an IPO purportedly to occur in July, 2014.

    The SEC is entirely wrong to state that shares will increase as the as the amount of PRPT increases. If 1 PRPT would have converted to 1 share at the outset, but instead that PRPT was left to double and redouble numerous times, say to 360 PRPT before converting, it would still convert to only 1 share. Many investors, such as myself, saw the potential of a large number of Asian consumers, who highly value education, purchasing on-line lessons and paying to visit learning centers where their children and grandchildren would learn English, Personal Finance, Ethics, Mathematics, Memory Skills, Creativity, etc.

    This is presently all underway, with numerous courses develpoed and two learning centers opened to date. Unfortunately the company failed to maintain control over its marketing arm, and those people have tarnished an otherwise very worthy business venture. If the SEC doesn’t understand the PRPT issue, which they clearly don’t based on the statements in its filing, how beleivable is their statement that the company lacks the financial wherewithall to go public.

    Do they have access to company records in Hong Kong? I think not. As to their allegations of impropriety because of bank deposits and transfers, do they understand that is how most U.S. investors transferred money into their CKB accounts in Hong Kong, ie., by transferring money into the U.S. bank accounts of existing investors, who then had that amount of money tranferred out of their Hong Kong CKB account into the new investor’s Hong Kong CKB account? To save otherwise costly foreign exchange and bank transfer fees. This is not illegal, but the SEC makes it look like money laundering.

    Further, the SEC trys to make this look like a Ponzi scheme by showing the pyramid relationship of those charged. Pyramid sales structures are not illegal. Ponzi schemes are. I don’t think this comes close to a Ponzi. So while the SEC is right to stop the illegal marketing practices, which I have witnessed first hand, the SEC should not destroy a potentially viable and profitable business venture in its inception.

    The SEC should be protecting its U.S. investors, not acting in a manner to harm them. Regardless of whether an investor was misled into thinking his investment will grow like Jack’s beanstalk, such investor was still given shares in the company, and there is every chance the investment will return some level of profit, if the SEC doesn’t throw the baby out with the bathwater.

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  8. John,

    I added carriage returns to your comment and deleted the URL you posted because it would confuse readers.

    In the future, please use carriage returns and post your comments in this thread:

    http://patrickpretty.com/2013/10/17/urgent-bulletin-moving-sec-charges-3-executives-8-promoters-of-alleged-worldwide-pyramid-scheme-operating-from-hong-kong-canada-and-british-virgin-islands-ckb-and-ckb168-frauds/

    I’ll respond to your comment when I get a chance.

    Thank you.

    Patrick

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  9. John,

    I see this case as a textbook offering fraud. A “blueprint” for this type of fraud has existed at least for a couple of years. It has been used in British Columbia, Canada, for instance.

    John: As to their allegations of impropriety because of bank deposits and transfers, do they understand that is how most U.S. investors transferred money into their CKB accounts in Hong Kong, ie., by transferring money into the U.S. bank accounts of existing investors, who then had that amount of money tranferred out of their Hong Kong CKB account into the new investor’s Hong Kong CKB account? To save otherwise costly foreign exchange and bank transfer fees. This is not illegal, but the SEC makes it look like money laundering.

    What you describe as “not illegal,” I’d describe as a crystal-clear marker of a scam. It’s a sort of maximum red flag, variations of which have been present in infamous Ponzi schemes such as AdSurfDaily and ZeekRewards and outrageous securities-fraud schemes such as Imperia Invest IBC.

    There’s little doubt that something similar is occurring with the WCM777 “program,” which is under investigation in multiple countries.

    On a side note, the securities angle is just one concern. When this type of circuitous money movement is in play, tax fraud also is a concern.

    I see it as an issue of national security because it creates “money mules.” The banks may think they’re doing business with a legitimate customer, but the tiering may add layers and layers of murkiness.

    The Profitable Sunrise scam is another case in point. In that case, investors were paying their uplines and the uplines were sending money via wire offshore to an exceptionally murky individual.

    Patrick

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  10. Quick note: Forgot to mention that the PP Blog story on CKB has been getting pounded by nasty travelers; it’s as though the URL for the story had been loaded into a cannon. Wave after wave of resource-straining traffic shows up at that thread — far as I can tell, in groups of 10 or more IPs at a time.

    Patrick

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  11. admin: Quick note: Forgot to mention that the PP Blog story on CKB has been getting pounded by nasty travelers; it’s as though the URL for the story had been loaded into a cannon. Wave after wave of resource-straining traffic shows up at that thread — far as I can tell, in groups of 10 or more IPs at a time.

    Here’s a screen shot of a wave that arrived at the CKB thread at about 8:45 a.m. today:

    http://patrickpretty.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/ckbwave011614small.jpg

    Patrick

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  12. Patrick,
    Thanks for the response to my post, which I just now belatedly read. First, I
    appreciate the information on all these nefarious activities which cheat
    innocent people out of their money. Keep up the good work.
    I respectfully disagree with some of your comments regarding CKB.
    I stated above there are two severable issues here, one bad, one not.
    The bad side, the marketing approach used by those charged by the SEC
    was clearly illegal and the SEC rightfully moved in to stop the fraudulent claims regarding the growth of “PRPT” and its economic value, which it clearly lacked. This deserves all the light you can shine on it.
    What frustrates me is that the SEC and you cannot see or choose to ignore
    the legitimate aspect of CKB168, the marketing of products and services to teach children valuable lessons in language skills, memory improvement, basic
    finance and personal ethical conduct. If you would care to read the company’s
    vision statement you would see that this is what it is all about. Unfortunately
    the founder lacked the business sense and judgement to realize she allowed
    a bunch of crooks to devise a fraudulent mechanism for promoting huge returns to legitimate investors who very much liked the idea of the educational
    products being marketed to a huge Asian populace that places high value on
    education.
    Please log onto the CKB website and read the vision statement. It will take only
    a few minutes. It’s your job to do so, to understand the background. Then
    tell me, would this not be a completely legitimate endeavor were it not for
    how it was marketed using “PRPT” and the promise of extremely inflated gains, but instead a simple solicitation to invest in a company that is developing
    educational products for children in Asian countries, a company that will go public on the HK exchange?
    You are following a lot of different entities. I doubt you’ve had the time to
    really understand the “PRPT” issue, but that’s the whole story here with
    CKB168. If you do understand that, you can easily separate the good from the
    bad.
    Thanks for your time.

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  13. Need to have direct contact with David myrland. Very very important. Thank you.

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